Genetics Genomics and Environmental Health

Post Initial discussion post (2 paragraphs minimum 8 sentences) and reply to 2 peers (4-5 sentences, intext citations) Reply to kelseys and Jennifers post

Genetics, Genomics, and Environmental Health

question-bubble.png Do you anticipate obtaining your DNA profile? Why, or why not?

What are the pros and cons of finding out your genetic makeup?

For your original post, please respond to these questions providing scholarly support for your opinion. Remember to include an APA formatted in-text citation and corresponding reference from a recent (within last 5 years) professional journal or website (NIH, CDC, etc.).


Provide your initial post, then engage at least two of your online colleagues in a discussion about his/her initial posts. Therefore, you should have at least one initial post and one response to each of two colleagues. Please note that your postings and responses must be “substantive”,

An APA formatted in-text citation and corresponding reference from a recent (within last 5 years) professional journal or website (NIH, CDC, etc.) are required in your initial discussion post. Blogs, magazines, and newspapers are NOT considered scholarly, professional sources.


48 minutes ago

Access the profile card for user: Kelsie SchulteKelsie Schulte

Discussion 4 Attachment

COLLAPSE

Do you anticipate obtaining your DNA profile? Why, or why not?

I honestly am not sure if I want to obtain my DNA profile. Why? Because yes it would be good to know what I have in my genetics, to be aware of possible complications in the future to prevent but then again some of them are not preventable where to all I will have then is a worry of whether or not it will happen to me. There’s good and bad to it but as of now, I believe I have lived a good life without knowing what is next and just living day to day not wondering if it will or when something will strike in my life.

What are the pros and cons of finding out your genetic makeup?

The pros and cons to finding out your genetic makeup is basically my reasoning above. Finding out can lead to worry and stress that is unneeded but can also be good to lead to preventive measures you can take and start doing now. Also, just like everything else, we are not the only people that have access to our information, there is no telling who may see these results and what if it could possibly effect other things in the future such as our insurances. I believe this can lead to coinsurances that don’t need to happen or thoughts that probably would never be in our minds if we did not predispose ourselves to with the findings.

Reference:

R. S. (2018, June 18). Results Of At-Home Genetic Tests For Health Can Be Hard To Interpret. Retrieved from https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/06/…

Jennifer Ruiz

In 2008 I was diagnosed with Stage 2B right breast cancer. In 2009 after completing my chemo and radiation treatments, I underwent testing for the BRCA 1 and 2 genes by the recommendation of my doctor. I have two daughters, and positive results would mean an increased risk that they could develop breast cancer as well. Thankfully the results were negative! I don’t remember much about the testing procedure at the time, because it’s been so long. But I do remember it costing about $200 or so, and it wasn’t covered by my insurance.

One of the pros of finding out your genetic makeup is knowing your risk for disease as well as other family members. A con is that the results can trigger negative feelings such as guilt, anxiety, and depression.

Joy, K. (2017). Pros and cons of genetic testing: What to know before you go. Retrieved from https://healthblog.uofmhealth.org/health-managemen… genetic-testing-what-to-know-before-you-go

Genetics Genomics and Environmental Health
Scroll to top